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WWII Trivia ????????????????????#shorts #history #france #tanks



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WWII Trivia #shorts #history #france #tanks

The French Army had a handful of tanks on hand at the start of World War Two in 1939. Nevertheless, many of these tanks lacked adequate weaponry, armor, and mobility due to their age. The Renault R35, Hotchkiss H35, and Char B1 were the three main tank models used by the French Army.

A light tank called the Renault R35 was first produced in the middle of the 1930s. It featured a 37mm cannon and rather weak armor, which most German anti-tank weaponry could pierce. The R35 was still in use in 1939 and participated in the Battle of France despite its drawbacks.

Another light tank that was launched in the middle of the 1930s was the Hotchkiss H35. It was armored significantly more heavily than the R35 and was equipped with a 37mm cannon. Nonetheless, it was similarly sluggish as the R35 and lacked the defense and firepower required to defeat German tanks.

A large tank called the Char B1 was first produced in the late 1930s. With a 47mm gun and substantial armor, it was resistant to the majority of German anti-tank weaponry. It revealed to be susceptible to air strikes, but it was also sluggish and cumbersome to maneuver.

In general, the French Army's tanks in 1939 were not as sophisticated or efficient as those in the German Army. The French were aware of this and intended to update their fleet of tanks, but when war broke out in 1939, they were forced to use the tanks they had on hand.

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History
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